Purchase the On-demand workshop of past Live Event

This 1.5-hour workshop Psychologist and Trauma Therapist Dr. Ingrid Clayton

SELF-GASLIGHTING: HOW WE’VE INTERNALIZED A NARCISSISTIC PARENT’S GASLIGHTING FROM CHILDHOOD

This replay will only be available to purchase until April 20, 2022.

 

$57 USD
About this Workshop:

This workshop will help you identify less with our trauma and more with our True Self

Complex trauma as it relates to growing up with a narcissistic parent or step-parent can be difficult to identify because the psychological abuse is often hidden. Without bruises or more obvious markers, many survivors minimize their past without realizing they are minimizing their symptoms of a traumatized nervous system at the same time.

In this webinar, you will:

1. Develop a deeper understanding of how trauma from a narcissistic parent can manifest.

2. Discuss gaslighting, a form of emotional abuse where the narcissist uses manipulation and minimization to make someone question their reality.

3. Identify how self-gaslighting may have taken root in your own nervous system.

4. Practice somatic methods of regulating your nervous system.

5. Explore an experiential exercise to identify more with your true self and less with your trauma.

Note: After successful payment a link to watch this recording will be sent to your email address.

Monique Koven

Monique Koven

Monique Koven is a Certified Trauma Recovery Coach & host of The Healing Trauma Podcast.
Ingrid Clayton

Ingrid Clayton, Ph.D

Ingrid Clayton, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist in private practice and the author of Recovering Spirituality: Achieving Emotional Sobriety in Your Spiritual Practice (Hazelden, 2011). She is a regular contributor to Psychology Today where her recent piece, “What is Self-Gaslighting?” was considered an Essential Read.

While Ingrid has a clinical background, she is a survivor herself and believes there is no theory, diagnosis, or therapy that can replace the power of shared experience. Her current project is a memoir: Maybe It Wasn’t That Bad: A Psychologist’s Reckoning of a Childhood No One Believed. It is written from the gut, from the heart, where all of our hurt lives—so it speaks the same language. In addition to raising her beautiful son, she believes that gaining the courage to write this book is her greatest achievement to date.